Our own Prism

Independent and purposeful, informative and uniting, The PrismaThe Multicultural Newspaper-, is a shared journalistic adventure run by volunteers.

The Prisma concept was born in late 2009 and crystallised on the 29th December of that year.  It unites journalism with a similar dream born years ago in Colombia (South America).

The Prisma is concerned with analysis, research, criticism and debate, and seeks to provide information and opinions which are not always expressed in the mass media.

The Prisma was born in and works from its base in London, Great Britain. Without benefactors or employers, The Prisma is a truly independent publication and works to make a contribution to contemporary journalism, via the internet. It emerged in the middle of the crisis in order to confront it, aware of the obstacles it faced, but persisting with its unique face nevertheless.

The Prisma is produced by a team of professional journalists and experts, as well as young people who have just finished their journalism studies.  The team also boasts photographers, translators, designers, columnists, assistants, writers and contributors from all over the world… A team of more than 130 volunteers.

The Prisma team is a fresh team, where people from all over the world have come together: Latin American, Spanish, British, French, German, Chinese, Pakistani, Czech, Caribbean, North American, Italian, African, Portuguese and German, among others…

The Prisma is a bilingual publication, it publishes in both Spanish and English, to bring together the speakers of these two languages in the United Kingdom.  It works to create links between immigrants, Spanish speaking or otherwise, and natives of the UK.

The Prisma aims to demonstrate the vivacity of these cultures, their own identities and their own political, social and economic realities, both abroad and in the United Kingdom .

The Prisma is multicultural, conscious of the many languages that cannot be exercised in a world where English dominates. But it has made its first step towards being a multiple voice which speaks, is listened to, and makes its arguments.

The Prisma is a medium which relies on the support, solidarity and understanding of everyone and which opens, for the first time, a unique journalistic space in the United Kingdom.

The Prisma Works for the elimination of racial and cultural prejudices, and is committed to social justice and equality of opportunity. Our philosophy and our content promote and defend these values of the multicultural society of the UK, especially in the case of Latin Americans.

Mónica del Pilar Uribe Marín

Managing Director & Editor-In-Chief

 

WHO WE ARE?

 

Monica editMónica del Pilar Uribe (Founder, Managing Director and Editor-In-Chief of The Prisma)

 

She graduated with a BA in Social Communication (Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogota), completed Postgraduate studies in Ethics and Law, and is a Colombian professional journalist specialising in politics and human rights, author and co-author of several books on conflict resolution, workers and indigenous rights.

For more than 15 years she has been working as a journalist, editor or proofreader for a wide range of magazines, newspapers, online media and other parts of the publishing industry.
As a founder and director of Prisma magazine in Colombia, she was nominated for Best Contribution to Colombian Journalism from the ‘Simon Bolivar’ National Journalism Award. Years later, after moving to the UK she founded The Prisma – The Multicultural Newspaper in 2010, guided by her philosophy of independence, and defence of freedom and human rights.

She has been invited as a special guest to a number of international conferences to give talks on topics including the conflict in Colombia, human rights, indigenous peoples in Latin America, mega-projects in the Third World and independent journalism.

She is a member of the National Union of Journalists (NUJ) in the UK and of the Latin American Recognition Campaign – LARC.

She directed and co-produced “Colombia: Promises and Bullets”, a documentary on the internal conflict in Colombia. The documentary was broadcast in England, Spain and presented at various venues and film festivals and events in Europe, including the “Discovering Latin America Film Festival”, London.

This year some of her work was included in the National Literary Anthology “Cronistas Bogotanos” that will be published shortly in Colombia.

 

 

Graham (2)Graham Douglas – Advisor / Journalist and Translator

 

Born in the UK in 1946, he graduated in Chemistry from Imperial College in 1968, worked in biophysical research, then trained as a teacher and taught Chemistry and Maths in schools and colleges for many years.

Having lived and worked in southern Europe and Africa, he speaks French, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish. He completed the Institute of Linguists course for translation from Portuguese at City University in 2012.

An experienced researcher, his work on the statistical evidence for planetary cycles in human behaviour is published in the peer-reviewed journal Correlation, and on the website cura.free.fr.

Earlier he authored 3 articles on biological research, and 3 on astrological symbolism in the academic journal Semiotica . His local history research is credited in the book Loddiges of Hackney, by David Solman, published by the Hackney Society in 1995.

Graham joined The Prisma in 2010 as a Journalist and over time his commitment has extended to regular translation and proofreading.  His travel blog is at  www.matadornetwork.com/community/grammino

 

Cesar Amaya (3)César A. Sandino: Personal Assistant to the Director

 

Born in Bogota and raised in Colombia, Cesar moved to Spain over a decade ago in order to study Politics in Madrid. His commitment to issues of multiculturalism, and cultural diversity developed in his studies and with that in mind he began his career.

The 2008 financial crisis in Spain, and around the world, became dire and many young professionals like Cesar were (and are) faced with unpromising, or at least uncertain futures.

Cesar, encouraged by the multiculturalism of London and its dynamic cultural influences sought England as a place to extend his professional profile as it is a country with very diverse opportunities for its citizens.

Cesar began his involvement with The Prisma in 2011 and now holds the position of Personal Assistant to the Director sharing the coordination and management of volunteer journalists and also contributes articles.
The Prisma is part of Cesar’s contribution to society. He believes it provides insight into non-main stream opinions and ideologies, while encouraging learning and generating new ideas for the future. These are projects that reflect not only his academic background, but also his personal experience as an immigrant.

 

Grace EssexGrace Essex – Proofreader

 

Born in Australia. Studied French and Spanish to complete a Bachelor of Arts before continuing to finish a Masters in Translation Studies (Spanish-English). She now lives in London, England working part-time as a volunteer Proof Reader for The Prisma, as well as full time as an Office Administrator in an international manufacturing company. Grace joined The Prisma in 2012.

 

Columnists

 

 

MINREL CHILE 1970-73145 - copiaPablo Sapag M. – Columnist

 

He is Chilean, and holds degrees in Journalism at the Universities of Chile, and Alcalá de Henares in Madrid. He has worked for TVE in Spain, La Epoca in Santiago, Marca, and Noticias Latin America in London.

He was a special correspondent for RTV Madrid, in Albania (where he recorded a world exclusive distributed by CNN), and in many other places including: Kosovo, Macedonia, Bosnia, Afghanistan, Tadjikistan, Pakistan, Algeria, Morocco, the Middle East, Mexico, Argentina, Ulster, the Irish Republic, and Brussels. Currently he contributes analysis to European and Latin American publications, including Publico, and El Mostrador.

He holds a Ph.D in Information Sciences from the University of Alcalá de Henares, Madrid, where he is also a professor and researcher. Since completing postgraduate studies in the USA, Japan and Austria, he has published academic books and articles on the subjects of international journalism and TV; the work of war correspondents; and international relations.

He is Visiting Professor at a number of European and Latin-American universities, including Sussex, Chile, and the Catholic University of Santiago de Chile. Pablo joined The Prisma in 2010.

 

Campana-Chipana-sendato-2Claudio Chipana Gutiérrez – Columnist:

Peruvian philosopher. He has participated in several international events on Latin American philosophy.

His independent research projects have covered issues related to philosophy, Latin America, migration and multiculturalism. Founder of The Philosophy Cafe in London. He is a member and former coordinator in the Latin American Recognition Campaign (LARC) in London. Claido joined The Prisma in 2011.

 

Steve Latham  (9)Steve Latham – Columnist

 

Born in 1957 in Canada, he grew up near Manchester, and moved to London in 1981. He is married to Sue, and has two adult children.

Graduated in 1978 from York University with a BA in History and Politics, he went on to do a Master’s degree in Southern African Studies, doing research on Black Theology. From there, he went to St. John’s College in Nottingham, to do a Postgraduate Diploma in Theology.

Moving to London, he did youth work in the east end, and worked supporting Christian Unions in London University. Subsequently, he became Pastor at Hackney Downs Baptist Church. During this time, he worked with refugees and asylum-seekers, especially  Turkish and Kurds, and offered sanctuary to a Nigerian family facing deportation.

He went on to do his PhD, exploring prophetic ministry on the side of the poor; and then became Pastor of Westbourne Park Baptist Church, , founding community centre, Westbourne Park Family Centre.

Steve edited “Urban Church: a practitioner’s resource book”, has published several articles in Crucible, a journal of theology and social action, and also founded the “London urban theology project”. In 2011, he became a Tutor in Theology and Contemporary Culture at Spurgeon’s College, London.  Steve joined The Prisma in 2012.

 

img328Armando Orozco Tovar – Columnist

 

Born in Bogotá, Colombia, 4th May 1943, he qualified in Journalism at the University of Havana, Cuba in 1974, where he also gained prizes and honours for his poetry, of which he has published 10 books.

He appears in Poetry International, and his essays, articles and reports have been published in various media in Colombia and abroad.

He is a regular contributor to the weekly newspaper Voz – la Verdad del Pueblo. He also paints and draws, and his work has been exhibited in galleries including the Candelaria Theatre in Bogotá, directed by Santiago Garcia, the creator of modern theatre in Colombia.

For 30 years he taught in different educational establishments in Bogotá, and organized workshops at the Casa de Poesía Silva and at the Gilberto Alzate Avendaño Foundation.

An occasional traveller, he has spent time in the USSR, Cuba, Peru and Ecuador. He is currently working on a collection of articles to be called “Bitter notes”, and a book of “Atheist poems”. He lives with his wife, Maria Isabel Garcia Mayorca, in Bogotá. Armando joined The Prisma in 2012.

_MG_0228Nigel Pocock – Columnist

 

 Social scientist and theologian, lecturer at a large number of institutions, mostly within the African and African-Caribbean community.

Consultant to various bodies concerned with the legacy of slavery, and has assisted with material for the Wiltshire Museum Service, Bristol City Museum, BBC History On-line, Natural History Museum (Darwin and Slavery), and many others.

His work has been published in various journals.  Nigel joined The Prisma in 2012.

Mabel Encinas 11Mabel Encinas – Columnist

 

Born in Mexico and based in London, she works in the fields of education, psychology and art, with a particular interest in the role of human emotions.

She has been part of the Latin American Perspectives in Education Society (LAPE), the Latin American Recognition Campaign (LARC) and the Latin American Workers Association (LAWAS). Mabel has organised two Latin American Cultural Weeks on ‘The Practice of Freedom’ in honour of Paulo Freire (London Biennale 2010) and ‘Dialogues: América Latina’ (2012).

She is a poet and writer, member of the Hispanic American Women’s Literary Memory Workshop and the Spanish and Latin American Poets and Writers (SLAP).

Mabel holds a BA in Education and Psychology, a MA in Educational Research (Centro de Investigación y Etudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional in Mexico) and a PhD in Education and Psychology (Institute of Education, University of London).  Mabel has been a lecturer and has undertaken educational research and development in a number of institutions, both in Mexico and the UK. Mabel joined The Prisma in 2014.

 

 

………..………..………..………..………..…………………….. 

 

José Antonio Sierra  – Promotor for The Prisma in Ávila (Spain).

Born in Ávila, Spain, José lived outside of his country for 40 years, alternating between France and Ireland. Now, at over 70-years-old he is part of a generation of Spanish emigrants who, after years of living abroad, have finally returned home. He spent his life trying to help Spanish emigrants, and in 1971 he launched The Spanish Cultural Institute (predecessor of The Cervantes Institute) where he offered Spanish cinema, Machado poetry readings, and from 1975 they even began teaching other Spanish languages.  José Antonio joined The Prisma in 2014.

 

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